THE ITALIAN GIRL’S SECRET

September 14, 2021

MY THOUGHTS

It’s 1943 and the war rages on through Europe.  Carmela del Bosco lives a quiet life at her grandmother’s remote farmhouse.  Carmela is asked by her brother Danielo to hide a fugitive Sebastiano at her house.  Reluctantly she agrees even though she knows that the Germans will kill anyone that they think is an enemy.  She takes the risk and everyday Carmela tends to Sebastiano’s injuries while keeping him rested, fed, clothed and bathed.  As she and Sebastiano develop friendship and a bond, she knows that they are each other’s hope to make it through the darkest days of their lives.  When Sebastiano escapes Carmela is forced to run away to Naples to live in her estranged father’s home.  This story was absolutely amazing, beautiful and gave a wonderful example of people helping each other when they need it the most.  I enjoyed the character of Carmela so much.  She was like an old friend that I’ve known for years.  There was such a connection with storyline, the author pulls you into the story at the very first page.

Thank you Natalie Meg Evans for such a heartbreaking and riveting story.  I felt as if I wanted to reach out and walk side by side with the characters.  The hope that the people had during those horrible times was so amazing. I had such compassion for them. This phenomenal story is a must read and I highly recommend this book.

Rating: 5 out of 5.


ABOUT THE BOOK


THE ITALIAN GIRL’S SECRETTHE ITALIAN GIRL’S SECRET
Author: Natalie Meg Evans
Published by Bookouture
Publication Date: September 10, 2021
Pages: 302
Buy on Amazon

Italy, 1943. In the hills outside Naples, the silver moon shines brightly on a whitewashed farmhouse. An urgent knock on the door breaks the silence: and in that moment, one young woman’s act of incredible bravery changes the course of the war.

For Carmela del Bosco, a farm girl in a remote Italian village, sheltering an English spy is the most dangerous thing she could do. If she’s caught by the fascists it would be the end, especially for her beloved grandmother sleeping soundly upstairs. But taking in the pleading brown eyes of the man calling himself Sebastiano slumped at her door, and his terrible injuries inflicted by the Nazi occupiers, Carmela remembers how Nonna always taught her right from wrong. Risking everything, she hides him in a ruined tower on the edge of the farm.

Each day Carmela tends his wounds, and the passion that kindles between them is a light in the darkest time. Sebastiano has information that could end the war, and needs her help to send it. But tracking down fellow members of the resistenza in the mountains means risking her life and bringing danger to everyone she knows.

Carmela knows she must find the courage to do what’s right for her country. But if she leaves the farm, will she ever see her beloved nonna again? And will her sacrifice tear her away from the only man she’s ever loved, forever?

About Natalie Meg Evans

Natalie Meg Evans has been an art student, actor, PR copywriter, book-keeper and bar tender but always wanted to write. A USA Today best-seller and RITA nominee, she is author of four published novels which follow the fortunes of strong-minded women during the 1930s and 40s. Fashion, manners and art are the glass through which her characters’ lives are viewed. Each novel is laced with passion, romance and desire. Mystery is never far away.

An avid absorber of history – for her sixth birthday she got a toy Arthurian castle with plastic knights – Natalie views historical fiction as theatre for the imagination. Her novels delve behind the scenes of a prestige industry: high fashion, millinery, theatre, wine making. Rich arenas for love and conflict. Most at home in the English countryside, Natalie lives in rural Suffolk. She has one son.

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4 responses to “THE ITALIAN GIRL’S SECRET

  1. Anonymous

    Thank you so much for the review Caroline. It makes work of writing a novel worthwhile, to know that readers have really enjoyed turning the pages. Thanks for blogging, we writers are much in your debt